Anti-Gouging Laws Hurt the Vulnerable and Increase Suffering

The approaching Hurricane Matthew has led to news reports that governments are warning residents and businesses in Florida about price gouging. It brings up a question related to my recent post on FB about a narrow question of economics. Do anti-gouging laws actually hurt people?  Or is that just a myth of the cultural Marxists to scare people from helping one another and turn instead to benevolent Uncle Sam for rescue?
 
Here’s the very real scenario: people hit the stores to stock up on the essentials: beer, milk, bread, etc. Consequently, the stores run out of those essentials. Entrepreneurs who are beyond the danger zone of Hurricane Matthew see an opportunity, buy up beer, milk and bread, buy coolers and ice, load up their trucks and vans, and drive into the danger zone to sell these supplies.
 
Naturally, they do not sell them at the same price they bought them for. They want to make a profit. First, they add the cost of the ice, the cooler, and the gas, and if they are smart, they add the value of their time for the shopping, loading, driving and working, meals on the road, lodging, and then they set a price above this amount which would represent some hoped-for profit margin. The price could easily be double or triple the normal price.
 
Now, the state would consider this gouging. Many on the Left and Right rage against the practice. And yet, aren’t these entrepreneurs actually doing the consumer a fabulous service?
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Celebrating Labor Day? Don’t

President Cleveland created Labor Day on June 28, 1894 in an attempt to quell a strike by 150,000 railroad workers that had crippled the country’s economy.  The striking laborers refused to go back to work and eventually clashed with federal troops. Their leader, Eugene Debs, was sent to prison, where he eventually became a Marxist.

The common ideology of the unions and the socialists made for a profitable long-term alliance.  Each sought to overthrow the existing order, each proclaimed an entitlement to the property of others, and each was quick to resort to violence when lawful means were unproductive.  Within two years of the institution of Labor Day, a quarter of a million workers in Chicago walked off their jobs, demanding a shorter work week (but the same pay).  As so many strikes do, this one resulted in violence when police attempting to disperse the crowd at the Haymarket Square were attacked with a dynamite bomb.  Seven police officers were killed.  They would be the first victims of the new century of union, socialist violence.

The unions have long cultivated the myth that their reason for existence is the promotion of workers’ rights, but from their earliest days the opposite has been true.  Shortly after the Civil War, as black Americans flooded northern industrial areas in search of jobs, labor unions such as The Brotherhood of Railroad Firemen and Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen prohibited the admission of black members.  They also banned Catholics.  Consequently, the railroads employed almost exclusively white … Read the rest

Top Ten Causes of Death for 2016

As of August 25, these are the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States.

 Abortion          690,193
Heart disease          400,589
Cancer          385,820
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease            95,918
Accidents            88,714
Stroke            86,790
Alzheimer’s            60,994
Diabetes            49,874
Influenza and Pneumonia            36,011
Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis            31,394

As a percentage of the total:

 Abortion 36%
Heart disease 21%
Cancer 20%
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease 5%
Accidents 5%
Stroke 5%
Alzheimer’s 3%
Diabetes 3%
Influenza and Pneumonia 2%
Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis 2%

How many people have died from each cause today:

 Abortion              2,899
Heart disease              1,683
Cancer              1,621
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease                  403
Accidents                  373
Stroke                  365
Alzheimer’s                  256
Diabetes                  210
Influenza and Pneumonia                  151
Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis                  132

Sources:  CDC, Guttmacher Institute

 … Read the rest

Back to School and Celebrating Atomic Warfare

It’s August and that means back to school pictures by soccer moms and memes celebrating the anniversary our bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The heat and humidity has sapped my will to debate these people on Facebook and so I have shortened my debates with the warmongers to this simple, undeniable observation: those who justify the atomic murdering of innocent women and children are effectively no different than ISIS, except in terms of scale.

Why can they not see this? How could we ever hope to win the war against abortion when we defend-even celebrate-mass murder?

See how this discussion played out on Facebook:

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Eating a Donut Can Send You to Jail

We incarcerate people at a rate matched only by North Korea. Why? It would seem there are only three possible explanations:

1) Our justice system is vastly better at catching bad guys than anyone else in the world
2) Our citizens are much more prone to criminality than anyone else in the world
3) Something is wrong

Here’s an article I recommend at ReasonRead the rest