Unmasking the Secret Religion of the Academics

Yesterday I got into an argument with a bright gal I knew in high school. She’s doing graduate research work at Vanderbilt and has decided she’s an expert on the Wuhan.  The gal was doing lots of sighing and impatiently lecturing me on why we must all wear masks all the time and that any contrary opinion or conduct meant I didn’t deserve the rights and privileges of a citizen (let alone that of a veteran).
 
You probably know where this is going.
 
You all know that I don’t mind people wearing masks who are sick, or vulnerable, or who must in order to safely fulfill their duties according to their state in life.  I’ve even organized the purchase of masks for liturgical occasions.
However, I pointed out that even the N95 masks often worn by medical personnel don’t protect you from the Wuhan (these masks are designed for dust, mists, fumes etc., and only offer 95% protection down to 0.3 microns, while the Wuhan virus is 67% smaller than that at just 0.1 microns in size). 
Of course, the cotton masks that most of us are wearing in public so we don’t go to jail merely increase the risks of hypoxia, hypercapnia, vertigo and seizures (plus minor stuff like headaches, tinnitus and cognitive impairment).
 
Anyway, she angrily demanded to know my sources, so I cited the CDC, the WHO, the New England Medical Journal plus the manufacturer of the masks on this point.
I mean, we all
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This Is Why Democracy Fails

I got a lot of criticism in 2016 for claiming the Democrats cheat by 1-3% each election. Then there came the discovery of the fraud in NJ in 2017. Now this. I’m shocked. Shocked!

As reported by the National Review’s Deroy Murdock, who did some numbers-crunching of his own, “some 3.5 million more people are registered to vote in the U.S. than are alive among America’s adult citizens. Such staggering inaccuracy is an engraved invitation to voter fraud.”

Murdock counted Judicial Watch’s state-by-state tally and found that 462 U.S. counties had a registration rate exceeding 100% of all eligible voters. That’s 3.552 million people, who Murdock calls “ghost voters.” And how many people is that? There are 21 states that don’t have that many people.

Nor are these tiny, rural counties or places that don’t have the wherewithal to police their voter rolls.

California, for instance, has 11 counties with more registered voters than actual voters. Perhaps not surprisingly — it is deep-Blue State California, after all — 10 of those counties voted heavily for Hillary Clinton.

Los Angeles County, whose more than 10 million people make it the nation’s most populous county, had 12% more registered voters than live ones, some 707,475 votes. That’s a huge number of possible votes in an election.

But, Murdock notes, “California’s San Diego County earns the enchilada grande. Its 138% registration translates into 810,966 ghost voters.”

U.S. Has 3.5 Million More Registered Voters Than Live Adults — A Red Flag For Electoral

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The Catholic Church’s Teaching on Voting and Political Discernment

Gerry Matatics is a internationally recognized scriptural scholar and apologist for the traditional Catholic faith who was once a Presbyterian minister.  He graduated from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, studied at Biblical Interpretation from Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, has taught at Christendom College, Aquinas College, St. John’s in New York, Notre Dame Graduate School of Theology, St. Joseph University, University of San Diego, and Our Lady of Guadalupe International Seminary and now writes, lectures and teaches in defense of the Catholic faith.

I had an opportunity to interview Gerry this morning regarding the 2016 Presidential election tomorrow.  He explains in detail what the Catholic Church teaches about:

  • Our obligation to vote
  • The ‘lesser of two evils’ argument
  • Whether Donald and Hillary are both unacceptable choices
  • How to commit a mortal sin in the voting booth

It’s an interesting topic.  Let me know what you think!

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